dglobalnews.com ICE Chief Might've Contradicted Trump On Immigrant Crime
Published: Sat, July 01, 2017
Global Media | By Cecelia Webb

ICE Chief Might've Contradicted Trump On Immigrant Crime

ICE Chief Might've Contradicted Trump On Immigrant Crime

The second bill - No Sanctuary for Criminals Act - withholds federal money from cities that limit their cooperation with immigration laws.

Many local officials, including those in law enforcement, argue that "sanctuary" policies are about public safety: They encourage community trust in police and allow them to save resources and funds for going after non-immigration crimes. Bob Goodlatte (R-VA), would also allow victims of crimes committed by illegal immigrants the ability to sue sanctuary cities if they "released the alien from custody prior to the commission of such crime as a outcome of the State or political subdivision's declining to honor a detainer".

Trump is urging the Senate to follow the House's lead, saying that implementation of the policies "will make our communities safer". Goodnow also said that even if the law were passed, its fight would be "far from over".

The first is referred to as "Kate's Law" and would create stiffer penalties for individuals repeatedly entering the United States illegally who have criminal charges, CNN reported. An undocumented immigrant was charged with the murder.

FAIR supports the Davis-Oliver Act and continues to fight for its consideration on the House floor. "These bills can restore sanity and common-sense to our system by ending abusive attempts to undermine federal law, and they can prevent future tragedies by empowering law enforcement".

The bills, introduced by House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte (R-Va.) and backed by the White House, seek to enhance public safety by punishing sanctuary cities and criminal aliens who re-enter the US after deportation.

These sanctuary-city movement and its anti-Trump allies on the bench are wrong, constituting a clear effort to illegally circumvent federal law.

Chernobyl's radiation monitoring hit by cyberattack: spokeswoman
It encrypts files on a PC, displaying a flashing red-and-white skull and crossbones before a demand for $US300 to free them. Ukrainian Prime Minister Volodymyr Groysman, described the attack as "unprecedented" in a post on Facebook .

Nobody stands above the law - not the self-righteous local officials who obstruct the law by taking part in the sanctuary city movement, and not the criminals who return to the USA again and again and commit violent crimes. One would cut off some federal grants from so-called sanctuary cities that limit cooperation with immigration authorities; the other would impose tougher sentences on criminals who have entered the USA illegally multiple times.

Supporters of more restrictive immigration laws argued that the Mexican citizen charged with Steinle's murder shouldn't have received such a lenient sentence for violating USA immigration laws (and, separately, that San Francisco shouldn't have released him in defiance of federal authorities).

Critics of efforts targeting "sanctuary cities" blasted the bills' passages Thursday, saying it's inappropriate for the US government to mandate that local law enforcement agencies enforce federal laws - particularly by threatening to cut funding, which totals in the billions nationwide. The bill now heads to the US Senate for approval. An illegal immigrant from Honduras, Edwin Mejia, is wanted for motor vehicle homicide in the case, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Under the bill, people could be sentenced to up to 25 years if they reentered the US after being convicted of certain crimes, some of them immigration-related.

Twenty-four House Democrats voted for the measure named after Steinle, as Trump praised passage of these bills.

Congress also is getting in on the act, with two bills now before it to tighten up immigration rules.

During his address to Congress, Trump announced a new Homeland Security office called Victims of Immigration Crime Engagement (VOICE) to assist victims of crimes committed by immigrants in the country illegally.

President Trump's policies have already had an impact, with 64 percent fewer apprehensions and inadmissible entries at the southwest border compared to the same time past year.

Like this: